Last Week in the Global Economy (1-6 July)

Frontier Research does this nifty summary as a part of its overall range of news products, usually for private clients. They scour through the myriad goings on in the global economy so you don’t have to, and bring out what’s relevant from a Sri Lankan non-expert’s perspective. Pretty useful if you’re generally into economics, or just want to get a feel of current hot topics. Here I’ve syndicated their Weekly News Summary with permission. The “markets” section gives a lowdown of global stock and crude oil markets, but for the more interesting analysis and discussions check out the “views” section.

The Week in Global Markets

Anticipation of monetary policy easing in Europe and Asia stimulated markets in those regions, while lingering optimism from last week’s Euro summit also propped up European markets. But pessimism about the same in the US, along with weakening job data, caused markets there to fall. WTI and Brent crude moved in opposite directions. WTI fell on account of weak US job data, while Brent rose on account of an oil workers’ strike in Norway.

The Week in Economic Views

Given current global events, the question is being asked if India is prepared for a real European crisis; a salient point for Sri Lanka to ponder as well because of its dependence on European markets.

On that topic, a very pessimistic, but comprehensive analysis of the current global economic situation comes from Swaminomics.

Military polarization has been advancing quietly in the Asian region. Increasingly, the so called ‘middle-nations’ between the West and China are finding a need to strike a balance in military relations with the two global giants; especially in the context of Burma’s recent troubles.

Meanwhile, a media outcry has made the Pakistan authorities enforce adherence to standards of physical fitness in its police force, which has obtained an image of being fat and corrupt.

South East Asian countries are set to become an IPO hotbed in months to come as several firms prepare to go public in an investment environment where IPOs are facing bleak prospects globally, including Sri Lanka.

India’s biggest Tea company is seeing very high profit growth due to Tea prices rising on a global production shortfall; a useful and positive perspective for Sri Lankan Plantations.

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